What role do intermediaries in the US pharmaceutical supply chain play in ensuring the quality of the drugs they are distributing

What role do intermediaries in the US pharmaceutical supply chain play in ensuring the quality of the drugs they are distributing

The United States pharmaceutical supply chain is a complex and multifaceted system that plays a critical role in ensuring the quality and safety of drugs available to the American public. This intricate network consists of various intermediaries that act as crucial links between drug manufacturers and patients. These intermediaries include wholesalers, distributors, pharmacies, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), and health insurers. Each of them has a distinct role in safeguarding the quality of drugs while also serving economic and logistical functions.

Wholesalers and Distributors

Wholesalers and distributors are the initial intermediaries in the pharmaceutical supply chain. They purchase pharmaceuticals in bulk from manufacturers and then distribute them to pharmacies, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Their role in ensuring drug quality is multi-faceted:

  • Storage and Handling: Wholesalers and distributors are responsible for maintaining proper storage conditions to prevent degradation of drugs. This includes controlling temperature, humidity, and other environmental factors that can affect drug efficacy and safety.
  • Product Authentication: They implement procedures designed to reduce counterfeit or substandard products from entering the supply chain.
  • Recall Management: In case of drug recalls or safety issues, wholesalers play a crucial role in swiftly removing affected products from circulation, preventing potential harm to patients.
  • Documentation and Record-keeping: They maintain detailed records of drug transactions, which can aid in traceability and accountability in case of quality issues or recalls.

Pharmacies

Pharmacies, as the last link before the drugs reach the patients, have significant responsibilities in ensuring drug quality:

  • Dispensing Accuracy: Pharmacists are responsible for accurately dispensing medications and ensuring that the right drug, in the right form and dosage, is provided to patients.
  • Patient Counseling: Pharmacists offer counseling to patients on how to properly take their medications, including potential side effects and interactions with other drugs, enhancing patient safety.
  • Storage and Handling: Pharmacies must also maintain proper storage conditions, especially for medications that require specific environmental controls.
  • Reporting Adverse Events: Pharmacists play a role in monitoring and reporting adverse drug reactions or quality issues to the manufacturer and regulatory authorities.

Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs)

PBMs are responsible for managing drug benefits for health insurance plans. They have a substantial impact on drug quality in several ways:

  • Formulary Management: PBMs decide which drugs are covered by insurance plans. They assess the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of drugs, influencing which medications patients have access to.
  • Drug Utilization Review: PBMs conduct reviews to identify potential issues, such as drug interactions, excessive dosages, or potential adverse effects, helping to ensure patient safety.
  • Cost Control: While primarily focused on cost containment, PBMs indirectly contribute to drug quality by ensuring that expensive medications are appropriately managed and used when necessary.

Health Insurers

Health insurers have a broader role in the healthcare system, but they indirectly impact drug quality by:

  • Network Selection: Insurers create networks of healthcare providers and pharmacies. They often require adherence to quality and safety standards as a condition for network participation.
  • Coverage Policies: Insurers establish policies for medication coverage, which can impact the types and quality of drugs accessible to policyholders.
  • Patient Education: They may provide resources and information to policyholders about drug safety and adherence.

The collective efforts of these intermediaries in the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain contribute to drug quality assurance through various mechanisms:

  • Regulatory Compliance: They must adhere to the regulations and quality standards set by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory bodies. Failure to comply can result in legal consequences.
  • Product Authentication: The supply chain intermediaries play a role in monitoring that the drugs they handle are authentic and safe. Counterfeit and substandard drugs are significant threats, and their vigilant efforts help mitigate these risks.
  • Traceability: Comprehensive record-keeping and documentation of transactions enable efficient traceability of drugs throughout the supply chain. This aids in tracking the source of any quality issues or recalls, allowing for targeted interventions.
  • Recall Management: Intermediaries work in tandem with manufacturers and regulatory agencies to swiftly remove potentially harmful or defective drugs from circulation, protecting patients from harm.
  • Patient Education: Through patient counseling and educational resources, intermediaries also contribute to ensuring that patients understand how to take their medications safely, including possible side effects and interactions.

However, the pharmaceutical supply chain in the United States is not without its challenges. Issues such as drug shortages, pricing concerns, and the need for innovative technologies to address coverage gaps, and improved transparency and interoperability of data among intermediaries continue to be subjects of debate and reform efforts.

In recent years, technological advancements, such as blockchain and track-and-trace systems, have been introduced to enhance transparency and traceability within the pharmaceutical supply chain. These innovations aim to strengthen the role of intermediaries in ensuring drug quality by providing real-time visibility into the movement of drugs.

Also read: The Changes And Challenges in The Healthcare Supply Chain

Additionally, the opioid epidemic in the United States has highlighted the need for increased vigilance among intermediaries in the distribution of controlled substances. Regulatory agencies have implemented stricter controls, and intermediaries are under increased scrutiny to prevent the diversion of prescription opioids to the illicit market.

ARTiFACTS Verify offers an integrated approach to identifying substandard and falsified drugs:

  • Identification of suspect medicines through on-site testing at any point in the supply chain using paper analytical device technology that is cost-effective and requires minimal training.
  • Confirmation of the properties of medicines failing the initial test through further testing at specialist labs, using advanced scientifically recognized techniques, including high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy, among others.
  • Coverage of over half of WHO’s 600 Essential Medicines.
  • Recording and analysis of results on a purpose-built blockchain platform which provides an immutable record of test results, including active pharmaceutical ingredients, product origin and manufacturer.

In conclusion, intermediaries in the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain play a vital role in ensuring the quality of drugs they distribute. Their responsibilities encompass various aspects, from verifying the authenticity of drugs to ensuring proper storage, handling, and dispensing. They also contribute to patient safety through education, monitoring, and reporting of adverse events. While challenges persist, ongoing efforts in regulation, technology, and transparency aim to strengthen the role of these intermediaries in maintaining the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain and, ultimately, the safety and well-being of patients.

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